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Claire Murphy

With the trilogues on the draft EU AI Act entering what is probably their final phase and the idea that procuring AI cannot be done lightly spreading, organizations are often confronted with hard choices, including on how to source AI responsibly and protect against liabilities with an uncertain developing legal framework. Contractual language is one

The regulation of artificial intelligence (AI) has been a hot topic in recent months, fueled by the disruption caused by Generative AI  and the privacy and security concerns it raised. Numerous regional and national initiatives around the globe are part of a race to define a regulatory approach with many challengers (ethical use, product safety, risk-based, human-centered) and no clear winners. What is certain, however, is that even within the EU Commission itself, many want to trophy AI regulation. Here is a brief roundup of the main four contenders.
Continue Reading The EU Approach to AI Regulation: Texts That Generative AI  Will Not Come Up With

The Spanish data protection and e-commerce legislation has been recently amended in order to, on the one hand, redefine the nature of the process to issue reprimands to data controllers and processors (so that reprimands are removed from the list of sanctions resulting from infringement of the regulations) and, on the other hand, relax the

Article 80 (2) of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) provides that Member States can entitle properly constituted not-for-profit bodies, organizations or associations that have statutory objectives which are in the public interest, and are active in the field of the protection of data subjects’ rights and freedoms, with the right to lodge complaints with